• November 30, 2021

America’s Great—if Small—Return to Drive-In Theaters

Drive-ins don’t usually have Rite Aids. Or post offices. They certainly don’t open with a kid in a T-shirt reading a message off their phone advising everyone to “wear a mask when leaving your car.” This place, though, isn’t a typical drive-in. It’s the parking lot of the Bel Aire Diner in Astoria, Queens, converted into a movie venue in the interest of keeping the restaurant’s staff employed and its customers safe from Covid-19. Like every other place on lockdown, it’s making it work.

On this particularly mild night in June, that means screening a documentary called Olympia, about Academy Award winner Olympia Dukakis. The actress is Greek, after all, and Astoria is home to a large Greek population. So when their opening night at Manhattan’s Quad Cinema got nixed by the coronavirus lockdowns, the movie’s producer and director—Anthoula Katsimatides and Harry Mavromichalis, respectively—decided to take it to the Bel Aire, which has been holding its parking lot screenings since it erected—or, rather, inflated—a portable screen and started playing movies like Grease and Dirty Dancing in early May. Although Olympia is a relatively unknown film, tonight’s screening is sold out: 45 cars total. They almost always sell out. The filmmakers couldn’t be more pleased. “Out of this horrible Covid thing that has happened,” Mavromichalis says, “you have little things like this that are just, I think to me, beautiful.”

Depending on where you live and the current state of your region’s stay-at-home orders, chances are you’ve noticed an increased awareness of drive-in movie theaters. Mainstays of mid-century Americana, most of them shut down long ago, unable to compete with the the cushy stadium seats, eye-popping visuals, and surround sound of multiplexes. But not all—there are still 305 such establishments in the US, according to the United Drive-In Theater Owners Association, and in the days of Covid-19, these and newer pop-ups have proven invaluable to people dying to be outside and entertained while also wearing masks and maintaining social distance.

click to read more
find more info
see it here
Homepage
a fantastic read
find this
Bonuses
read this article
click here now
browse this site
check here
original site
my response
pop over to these guys
my site
dig this
i thought about this
check this link right here now
his explanation
why not try these out
more info here
official site
look at this site
check it out
visit
click for more info
check these guys out
view publisher site
Get More Information
you can try this out
see this
learn this here now
directory
why not find out more
navigate to these guys
see this here
check my site
anchor
other
additional hints
look at this web-site
their explanation
internet
find more
Read More Here
here
Visit Website
hop over to this website
click
her latest blog
This Site
read review
try here
Clicking Here
page
read this post here
More Bonuses
recommended you read
go to this web-site
this
check that
Go Here
More hints
you could check here
Continued
More Help
try this
you could try here
website here
useful source
read the full info here
Discover More
click resources
over here
like this
Learn More
site web
navigate to this web-site
pop over to this website
Get the facts

Really, there isn’t a better metaphor than the drive-in for the current state of socializing in many American cities. People are together, or alone—or together alone—in individual clusters, isolated from each other while also sharing in the same experience. The coronavirus lockdowns have forced many people to rethink not only how they work and live but also how they share experiences with other people. Restaurants, bars, theaters, events—all of the staples of public engagement and human interaction have been altered, possibly permanently. In that shuffle, old modes, like drive-ins, have been pulled from the dustbin, a renaissance that could continue after every state is reopened.

Dorothea Mayes is witnessing this firsthand. Mayes has owned the Skyline Drive-In outside of Olympia, Washington, since 2004 (it first opened in 1964), and when people started searching for ways to hang out during the state’s stay-at-home orders, she started seeing a lot more people show up at her 312-car theater, close to double her usual attendance. People from Seattle, people from Bellevue—both over an hour’s drive away. “Social distancing is built in, so people who are very hungry to get out are coming,” Mayes says. “People are making dates to see each other. They bring their lawn chairs and they sit in front of their cars and they visit. They make play dates.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *